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Monthly Archives: March 2017

Tandem vs Free Fall On Your First Skydive

There are two common methods for taking on your very first dive: tandem jumping or accelerated free fall. In a tandem jump, you share a harness with an experienced skydiving instructor who has total control of the fall and landing. In an accelerated free fall, instructors help to guide you during your time in the air, but you are in your own harness, open your own parachute, and control your own landing. Each of these methods has some advantages and some disadvantages, and deciding which one is right for you depends largely on what you think your future as a skydiver will be.

Tandem jumping can be less frightening than an accelerated free fall, and many people opt to start out with a tandem jump in order to get a taste of what skydiving is like without having the responsibility of controlling any portion of their fall. Often, people who only plan to skydive once choose to take a tandem jump because it allows them to relax and enjoy the ride while their jumping partner worries about the altitude, the parachute, and the landing. This gives you the opportunity to experience the thrill of skydiving while knowing that your safety is in very capable hands.

In an accelerated free fall, you exit the plane with two instructors, one on either side of you, who maintain a grip on your harness for the duration of the fall, controlling your speed, helping you improve your position, and assisting you with stability. When you reach four thousand feet above the ground, you open your own parachute and pilot yourself down to the landing target. An accelerated free fall costs more than a tandem jump because it requires two guides instead of one, but unlike the tandem jump it can count as the first leg of your training course towards eventual certification. This makes it a good option as a first jump for people who are serious about continuing with their skydiving training.

 

Essential Equipment Required for Skydiving Adventure

Parachute. Undoubtedly the most important piece of equipment for any skydiver, the parachute is your lifeline after you’ve taken the plunge. The only way you’re making it back on the ground safely is if your parachute opens successfully and glides you softly to the ground. If you’re serious about skydiving, we suggest purchasing a parachute from a skydiving shop. These shops inspect and certify the equipment before selling it which means you’re getting top-of-the line products. Now’s not the time to be cheap.

Automatic Activation Device (AAD). Your automatic activation device is your safety net when free-falling. The AAD will launch your parachute even if you do not pull the ripcord manually. An automatic activation device senses how fast you’re falling and subsequently releases the backup parachute if the speed of your fall detects that your first parachute did not launch.

Jumpsuit. The sole purpose of a skydiving jumpsuit is to protect your clothing from powerful winds and objects (like trees and shrubs) when you’re approaching the ground. Similar to a parachute, it’s important that you purchase your jumpsuit from an official skydiving shop.

Learning to skydive is one of the most exciting things you’ll accomplish in your life but you need to acknowledge the importance of being prepared. Showing up for your first class without researching the equipment, rules and regulations beforehand will not only make it more difficult for you to learn but will also make it more difficult for your trainer to teach. The more you know beforehand, the faster you’ll learn the skills and techniques you need to skydive on your own. Before you know it, you’ll be free-falling from thousands of feet in the air – talk about a thrill!

 

Skydiving

If you’re planning to do this breathtaking activity, then you should be prepared to know that skydivers would usually exit their airplane at the height of 4000 metres or 13,000 feet. After doing so, you would have to do a freefall for a period of time and then you could open your parachute to slow down your descent until you reach a safe and slow landing speed.

Generally, the chute should be fully inflated by the height of around 2,500 ft. In fact it is part of the law that skydivers should jump with two chutes. One would be the main chute and the other would be the reserve, just in case the main parachute would fail.

Once your parachute is in its full inflation, you now have the ability to control your speed and direction using your chute’s steering lines. With that, technical manoeuvres could be executed by experienced skydivers giving them the ability to land with great accuracy. In fact, there are even some competitions held on being able to land in a specific spot with the most precision and style.

Other than bundling yourself out of the plane, opening a parachute and floating your way down to Earth, skydiving also have some specialization areas, and here are some of them.

Formation Skydiving: Creating Art While You Fall

During the freefall period of the jump, some experienced skydivers would combine to create and hold different formations before they breaking off and open up their parachutes and float down to earth as normal skydiving does. In fact, the world record for this kind of skydiving is actually a 400 man dive. The formation was maintained for 4.25 seconds from the altitude of 25,000 ft. in Udon Thai, Thailand.

Freestyle Skydiving: A Solo Performance

This kind of diving can be a very entertaining one. It is where the skydiver would perform some acrobatic manoeuvres and stunts, such as rolls, tumbles and graceful formations by himself throughout the freefall period and before he opens his parachute. Freestyle dives would also need the participation of another skydiver.

The second diver on the other hand would not do any kind of stunts. However, he would be the one to film his partners’ performance through a camera that is mounted on his helmet. This kind of dive is actually a registered competitive sport that was declared in 1996 by the FAI.

Free Flying: Do It Your Way

This is considered to be the art of controlling your body and having the ability to move through different static positions while you are in the freefall period of your jump, before you open your parachute. If you’ll be doing dives like this, you would have to do some manoeuvres like Sit Flying, Back Flying, and Head Down. These would allow you to have more control on your speed and trajectory. You also have to do some exit rolls or tumbles at the end of your freefall stage so that you can safely deploy your parachute by the time you reach the right altitude.